TU Darmstadt / ULB / tuprints

Molecular dynamics simulations

Tarmyshov, Konstantin B. :
Molecular dynamics simulations.
[Online-Edition]
TU Darmstadt
[Ph.D. Thesis], (2007)

[img]
Preview
Text
000_pdfsam_PhD_thesis_-_All_-_LinuxPS2PDF.ps.pdf
Available under Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (4Mb) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text
038_pdfsam_PhD_thesis_-_All_-_LinuxPS2PDF.ps.pdf
Available under Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (4Mb) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text
065_pdfsam_PhD_thesis_-_All_-_LinuxPS2PDF.ps.pdf
Available under Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (4Mb) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text
070_pdfsam_PhD_thesis_-_All_-_LinuxPS2PDF.ps.pdf
Available under Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (4Mb) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text
073_pdfsam_PhD_thesis_-_All_-_LinuxPS2PDF.ps.pdf
Available under Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (4Mb) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text
078_pdfsam_PhD_thesis_-_All_-_LinuxPS2PDF.ps.pdf
Available under Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (4Mb) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text
087_pdfsam_PhD_thesis_-_All_-_LinuxPS2PDF.ps.pdf
Available under Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (3853Kb) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text
100_pdfsam_PhD_thesis_-_All_-_LinuxPS2PDF.ps.pdf
Available under Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (3252Kb) | Preview
Item Type: Ph.D. Thesis
Title: Molecular dynamics simulations
Language: English
Abstract:

Molecular simulations can provide a detailed picture of a desired chemical, physical, or biological process. It has been developed over last 50 years and is being used now to solve a large variety of problems in many different fields. In particular, quantum calculations are very helpful to study small systems at a high resolution where electronic structure of compounds is accounted for. Molecular dynamics simulations, in turn, are employed to study development of a certain molecular ensemble via its development in time and space. Chapter 1 gives a short overview of techniques used today in molecular simulations field, their limitations, and their development. Chapter 2 concentrates on the description of methods used in this work to perform molecular dynamics simulations of cucurbit[6]uril in aqueous and salt solutions as well as metal-isopropanol interface. This is followed by Chapter 3 that outlines main areas in our life where these systems can be used. The development of instruments is as important as the scientific part of molecular simulations like methods and algorithms. Parallelization procedure of the atomistic molecular dynamics program YASP for shared-memory computer architectures is described in Chapter 4. Parallelization was restricted to the most CPU-time consuming parts: neighbour-list construction, calculation of non-bonded, angle and dihedral forces, and constraints. Most of the sequential FORTRAN code was kept; parallel constructs were inserted as compiler directives using the OpenMP standard. Only in the case of the neighbour list the data structure had to be changed. The parallel code achieves a useful speed-up over the sequential version for systems of several thousand atoms and above. On an IBM Regatta p690+, the throughput increases with the number of processors up to a maximum of 12-16 processors depending on characteristics of the simulated systems. On dual-processor Xeon systems, the speed-up is about 1.7. Certainly, these results will be of interest to other scientific groups in academia and industry that would like to improve their own simulation codes. In order to develop a molecular receptor or choose from already existing ones that fits certain needs one must have quite good knowledge of non-covalent host-guest interactions. One also wants to have control over the capture/release process via environment of the receptor (pH, salt concentration, etc.). Chapter 5 is devoted to molecular dynamics simulations preformed to study the microscopic structure and dynamics of cations bound to cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]) in water and in aqueous solutions of sodium, potassium, and calcium chloride. The molarities are 0.183M for the salts, and 0.0184M for CB[6]. The cations bind only to CB[6] carbonyl oxygens. They are never found inside the CB[6] cavity. Complexes with Na+ and K+ mostly involve one cation, whereas with Ca2+ single- and double-cation complexes are formed in similar proportions. The binding dynamics strongly depends on the type of cation. A smaller size or higher charge increases the residence time of a cation at a given carbonyl oxygen. The diffusion dynamics also corresponds to the binding strength of cations: the stronger binding the slower diffusion and reorientation dynamics. When bound to CB[6], sodium and potassium cations jump mainly between nearest or second-nearest neighbours. Calcium shows no hopping dynamics. It is coordinated predominantly by one CB[6] oxygen. A few water molecules (zero to four) can occupy the CB[6] cavity, which is delimited by the CB[6] oxygen faces. Their residence time is hardly influenced by sodium and potassium ions. In the case of calcium the residence time of the inner water increases notably. A simple structural model for the cations acting as “lids” over the CB[6] portal cannot, however, be confirmed. The slowing of the water exchange by the ions is a consequence of the generally slower dynamics in their presence and of their stable solvation shells. The study of binding behaviour of simple hydrophobic (Lennard-Jones) particles by CB[6] showed that these particles do not bind. A simple test showed that the size of hydrophobic particles in this case is important for a stable encapsulation. Another challenging field of research is the metal-organic interfaces. Particularly, transition metals are more difficult as they form chemical bonds, though sometimes very weak, with a large number of organic compounds. In Chapter 6 a molecular dynamics model and its parameterization procedure are devised and used to study adsorption of isopropanol on platinum(111) (Pt(111)) surface in unsaturated and oversaturated coverages regimes. Static and dynamic properties of the interface between Pt(111) and liquid isopropanol are also investigated. The magnitude of the adsorption energy at unsaturated level increases at higher coverages. At the oversaturated coverage (multilayer adsorption) the adsorption energy reduces, which coincides with findings by Panja et al. in their temperature-programmed desorption experiment (ref. 25). The density analysis showed a strong packing of molecules at the interface followed by a depletion layer and then by an oscillating density profile up to 3 nm. The distribution of individual atom types showed that the first adsorbed layer forms a hydrophobic methyl “brush”. This “brush” then determines the distributions further from the surface. In the second layer methyl and methine groups are closer to the surface and are followed by the hydroxyl groups; the third layer has exactly the inverted distribution. The alternating pattern extends up to about 2 nm from the surface. The orientational structure of molecules as a function of distance of molecules is determined by the atoms distribution and surprisingly does not depend on the electrostatic or chemical interactions of isopropanol with the metal surface. However, possible formation of hydrogen bonds in the first layer is notably influenced by these interactions. The surface-adsorbate interactions influence mobility of isopropanol molecules only in the first layer. Mobility in the higher layers is independent of these interactions. Finally, Chapter 7 summarizes main conclusions of the studies presented in this thesis and outlines perspectives of the future research.

Alternative Abstract:
Alternative AbstractLanguage
Molekulare Computersimulationen sind in der Lage, ein detailliertes Bild eines chemischen, physikalischen oder biologischen Prozesses zu liefern. Diese Technik wurde in den letzten 50 Jahren entwickelt und wird heutzutage bei der Bearbeitung einer Vielzahl von Problemen in vielen unterschiedlichen Wissenschaftsfeldern eingesetzt. Insbesondere sind quantenchemische Berechnungen zum Studium kleiner Systeme mit großer Genauigkeit einsetzbar, wenn die Elektronenstruktur der Moleküle eine Rolle spielt. Molekulardynamische Computersimulationen werden benutzt, um die örtliche und zeitliche Entwicklung eines molekularen Systems zu untersuchen. Kapitel 1 gibt einen kurzen Überblick der Methoden, die derzeit im Bereich der molekularen Simulationen genutzt werden, beschreibt ihre Grenzen und ihre Entwicklung. Kapitel 2 beschreibt die Methoden, die in dieser Arbeit zum Einsatz kamen. Kapitel 3 behandelt mögliche Anwendungsbereiche der untersuchten Systeme. Genauso wichtig wie die wissenschaftliche Erforschung von Methoden und Algorithmen in der Molekulardynamik ist die Weiterentwicklung der Werkzeuge. In Kapitel 4 wird eine Strategie zur Parallelisierung des Molekulardynamikprogramms YASP für shared-memory Computerarchitekturen beschrieben. Die Parallelisierung wurde auf die rechenintensiven Teile beschränkt: Konstruktion der Nachbarliste, Berechnung der nichtbindenden, Winkel- und Diederkräfte und Zwangsbedingungen. Der größte Teil des seriellen FORTRAN-Codes wurde erhalten. Parallele Konstrukte wurden unter Einsatz des OpenMP-Standards als Compilerdirektiven eingefügt. Nur im Fall der Nachbarliste mußte die Datenstruktur geändert werden. Der parallele Code erreicht eine zufriedenstellende Beschleunigung gegenüger der seriellen Version für Systeme aus einigen tausend Atomen und mehr. Auf einer IBM Regatta p690+ steigt der Durchsatz mit der Anzahl der Prozessoren bis zu einem Maximum von 12 – 16 Prozessoren abhängig von der Charakteristik des simulierten Systems. Auf Zweiprozessor-Xeon-Systemen beträgt die Beschleunigung bis zu 1.7. Sicherlich sind diese Ergebnisse von großem Interesse für andere Arbeitsgruppen in Forschung und Industrie, die ihre eigenen Simulationscodes optimieren wollen. Um einen molekularen Rezeptor zu entwickeln oder aus einer Auswahl bereits bekannter Rezeptoren einen für die jeweilige Anwendung geeigneten Rezeptor auszuwählen, bedarf es einer genauen Kenntnis der nichtkovalenten Wechselwirkung zwischen dem Rezeptor und dem Gastmolekül. Zusätzlich möchte man Einfluss auf den Assoziations- bzw. Dissoziationsprozess durch Veränderung äußerer Parameter (pH, Salzkonzentration usw.) nehmen können. Kapitel 5 ist den Molekulardynamiksimulationen gewidmet, die durchgeführt wurden, um die mikroskopische Struktur und die Dynamik des Bindens von Kationen an Cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]) in reinem Wasser und in wässrigen Lösungen von Natrium-, Kalium- bzw. Kalziumchlorid zu untersuchen. Die Molaritäten der Lösungen waren jeweils 0.183M für die Salze und 0.0184M für CB[6]. Die Kationen binden ausschließlich an die Carbonyl-Sauerstoffatome des CB[6]. Sie gelangen nicht in das Innere des CB[6]-Moleküls. Komplexe mit Na+- oder K+-Ionen enthalten meist nur ein Kation, während für Ca2+-Ionen in etwa gleichem Maße Komplexe mit ein oder zwei Kationen beobachtet werden. Die Bindungsdynamik hängt stark von der Art des Kations ab. Geringe Größe und hohe Ladung des Kations führen zu einer längeren Verweildauer des Ions an einem bestimmten Carbonyl-Sauerstoffatom. Die Dynamik der Diffusion entspricht der jeweiligen Bindungsstärke (Affinität) des Kations: Je stärker die Bindung, desto langsamer die Diffusion und die Reorientierungsdynamik. Nach der Bindung an das CB[6]-Molekül wandern Natrium- und Kaliumionen meist von einem Carbonyl-Sauerstoffatom zum benachbarten oder zum übernächsten Sauerstoffatom. Kalziumionen hingegen zeigen keine solche Wanderung. Sie sind vorwiegend an nur ein Sauerstoffatom gebunden. Der Innenraum des CB[6]-Moleküls, der durch die beiden Ebenen, die durch die Sauerstoffatome gebildet werden, begrenzt ist, nimmt nur wenige (null bis vier) Wassermoleküle auf. Die Verweildauer der Wassermoleküle im Innenraum wird durch Natrium- und Kaliumionen kaum beeinflußt. Das in der Literatur vorgeschlagene Modell, gemäß dem die Ionen eine Art Deckel über den Portalen des CB[6]-Innenraumes bilden, kann demnach nicht bestätigt werden. Die Verlangsamung des Wasseraustausches zwischen dem Innenraum und der Lösung ist eine Folge der generell langsameren Dynamik in Gegenwart von Salz und der Stabilität der Hydrathülle der Ionen. Eine Studie des Bindungsverhaltens von einfachen hydrophoben (Lennard-Jones) Molekülen an CB[6] zeigt, dass diese Teilchen nicht nennenswert an CB[6] binden. Durch Variation der Größe der hydrophoben Teilchen wurde gezeigt, dass dieser Parameter für eine stabile Komplexbildung entscheidend ist. Ein weiteres Gebiet dieser Arbeit beschäftigt sich mit Grenzschichten zwischen metallischen Oberflächen und organischen Substraten. Vor allem für Übergangsmetalle ist es anspruchsvoll, Wechselwirkung zu beschreiben, da die Übergangsmetalle mit einer großen Anzahl von organischen Substanzen chemische Bindungen unterschiedlicher Stärke ausbilden. In Kapitel 6 wird die Adsorption von Isopropanol auf einer Platin(111)-(Pt(111))-Oberfläche unter untersättigter und übersättigter Bedeckung mit Molekulardynamiksimulationen untersucht, wofür auch ein Parametrisierungverfahren entwickelt wurde. Ebenso wurden statische und dynamische Eigenschaften der Grenzschicht zwischen Pt(111) und flüssigem Isopropanol erforscht. Es wird gezeigt, dass untersättigter Bedeckung die Adsorptionsenergie mit der Bedeckung zunimmt. Bei übersättigter Bedeckung (Mehrschichtadsorption) ist die Adsorptionsenergie generell kleiner. Dies stimmt mit Temperatur-programmierten Desorptionsexperimenten überein. Die Analyse der Dichte zeigt eine Anreicherung der Moleküle auf der Oberfläche und darüber eine Verarmung der Moleküle. Die Oszillationen von Anreicherungen und Verarmungen im Dichteprofil sind bis zu einem Abstand von 3 nm von der Oberfläche beobachtbar. Ausserdem zeigt die Verteilung der einzelnen Atomtypen, dass die erste Schicht absorbierter Moleküle eine hydrophobe „Bürste“ von Methylgruppen ausbildet. Diese „Bürste“ bestimmt dann die weiter von der Oberfläche entfernten Verteilungen. In der zweiten Schicht liegen die Methyl- und Methin-Gruppen näher an der Metalloberfläche und die Hydroxylgruppen etwas weiter weg, während in der dritten Schicht die Atomgruppen exakt die umgekehrte Verteilung aufweisen. Dieses abwechselnde Muster wiederholt sich bis zu einer Distanz von 2 nm von der Metalloberfläche. Die Ausrichtung der Moleküle als Funktion von deren Distanz zur Oberfläche wird nur durch die Atomverteilung bestimmt und hängt überraschenderweise nicht von den elektrostatischen oder chemischen Wechselwirkungen von Isopropanol mit der Metalloberfläche ab. Dennoch wird die Bildung von Wasserstoffbrücken in der ersten Schicht merklich durch diese Wechselwirkungen beeinflusst. Die Wechselwirkungen zwischen Oberfläche und Adsorbat haben nur in der ersten Schicht einen Einfluss auf die Beweglichkeit von Isopropanolmolekülen. In allen weiter enfernten Schichten ist die Beweglichkeit davon unabhängig. Im Kapitel 7 werden die Hauptaussagen dieser Doktorarbeit zusammengefasst und Perspektiven für die zukünftige Forschung auf diesem Gebiet skizziert.German
Classification DDC: 500 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik > 500 Naturwissenschaften
Divisions: Fachbereich Chemie
Date Deposited: 17 Oct 2008 09:22
Last Modified: 10 Dec 2012 10:11
Official URL: http://elib.tu-darmstadt.de/diss/000787
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-7871
License: Simple publication rights for ULB
Referees: Schäfer, Prof. Dr. Rolf
Advisors: Müller-Plathe, Prof. Dr. Florian
Refereed: 5 February 2007
URI: http://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/id/eprint/787
Export:

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item