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The relationship between epicuticular long-chained hydrocarbons and surface area - volume ratios in insects (Diptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera)

Brückner, Adrian and Heethoff, Michael and Blüthgen, Nico :
The relationship between epicuticular long-chained hydrocarbons and surface area - volume ratios in insects (Diptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera).
[Online-Edition]
In: PLOS ONE, 12 (4) ISSN 1932-6203
[Article], (2017)

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Item Type: Article
Title: The relationship between epicuticular long-chained hydrocarbons and surface area - volume ratios in insects (Diptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera)
Language: English
Abstract:

Long-chain cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) are common components of the epicuticle of terrestrial arthropods. CHC serve as a protective barrier against environmental influences but also act as semiochemicals in animal communication. Regarding the latter aspect, species- or intra-functional group specific CHCs composition and variation are relatively well studied. However, comparative knowledge about the relationship of CHC quantity and their relation to surface area—volume ratios in the context of water loss and protection is fragmentary. Hence, we aim to study the taxon-specific relationship of the CHC amount and surface-area to volume ratio related to their functional role (e.g. in water loss). We focused on flower visiting insects and analyzed the CHC amounts of three insect orders (Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera and Diptera) using gas chromatography—mass spectrometry (GC-MS). We included 113 species from two grassland plots, quantified their CHCs, and measured their body mass and surface area. We found differences in the surface area, CHCs per body mass and the CHC density (= amount of CHCs per surface area) across the three insect taxa. Especially the Hymenoptera had a higher CHC density compared to Diptera and Lepidoptera. CHC density could be explained by surface area-volume ratios in Hymenoptera but not in Diptera and Lepidoptera. Unexpectedly, CHC density decreased with increasing surface area—volume ratios.

Journal or Publication Title: PLOS ONE
Volume: 12
Number: 4
Publisher: PLOS
Classification DDC: 500 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik > 590 Tiere (Zoologie)
Divisions: 10 Department of Biology
Date Deposited: 11 Apr 2017 09:44
Last Modified: 15 May 2017 11:14
Official URL: http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0175001
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-61429
Identification Number: 10.1371/journal.pone.0175001
URI: http://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/id/eprint/6142
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