TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUprints

The geopolitics of negative emissions technologies: learning lessons from REDD+ and renewable energy for afforestation, BECCS, and direct air capture

Kreuter, Judith ; Lederer, Markus (2022):
The geopolitics of negative emissions technologies: learning lessons from REDD+ and renewable energy for afforestation, BECCS, and direct air capture. (Publisher's Version)
In: Global Sustainability, 4, Cambridge University Press, e-ISSN 2059-4798,
DOI: 10.26083/tuprints-00020834,
[Article]

[img] Text
the-geopolitics-of-negative-emissions-technologies-learning-lessons-from-redd-and-renewable-energy-for-afforestation-beccs-and-direct-air-capture.pdf
Available under: CC BY 4.0 International - Creative Commons, Attribution.

Download (406kB)
Item Type: Article
Origin: Secondary publication via sponsored Golden Open Access
Status: Publisher's Version
Title: The geopolitics of negative emissions technologies: learning lessons from REDD+ and renewable energy for afforestation, BECCS, and direct air capture
Language: English
Abstract:

Non-technical summary: Negative emissions technologies (NETs) have received increasing interest in recent years as a potential part of a portfolio of measures to address anthropogenic climate change, in particular following the 2015 UN Framework Convention on Climate Change Paris Agreement and the 2018 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report ‘Global Warming of 1.5 °C’. This increasing significance for global climate policy is faced with a multitude of open questions regarding, among others, the geopolitical implications of large-scale use of NETs. This paper outlines what we can learn for the possible geopolitical futures of NETs from existing international ‘green’ approaches.

Technical summary: We contribute to assessing political implications of NET scenarios, addressing the following question: What are potential geopolitical challenges, conflicts, and consequences of a large-scale deployment of three NETs, namely afforestation, bio-energy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS), and direct air capture and carbon storage (DACCS)? We turn to the two cases of renewable energies and reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation for answers. We find that, first, not only afforestation, but also BECCS and even DACCS would have a geopolitical impact due to their requirements of territory – in the latter two cases, for instance, due to requirements for appropriate carbon storage space. Second, the material requirements of various NETs might also impact geopolitical constellations and induce conflict, providing certain countries and regions of the world with new leverage in the case of large-scale deployment, for instance those which can provide raw materials for fertilizer (for afforestation and BECCS) or energy generation (for DACCS). Third, discursive construction of space and identity might lead to very interesting new patterns of contestation, for instance if specific nation-states can successfully construct an identity of front-running climate protectors and use this to put pressure on other states.

Social media summary: What might be geopolitical implications of using NETs on a large scale to counteract anthropogenic climate change?

Journal or Publication Title: Global Sustainability
Volume of the journal: 4
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Collation: 14 Seiten
Classification DDC: 300 Sozialwissenschaften > 320 Politik
Divisions: 02 Department of History and Social Science > Institute of Political Science > International Relations
Date Deposited: 04 Apr 2022 12:27
Last Modified: 04 Apr 2022 12:27
DOI: 10.26083/tuprints-00020834
Corresponding Links:
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-208344
URI: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/id/eprint/20834
PPN:
Export:
Actions (login required)
View Item View Item