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Perception and prediction of the putting distance of robot putting movements under different visual/viewing conditions

Kollegger, Gerrit ; Wiemeyer, Josef ; Ewerton, Marco ; Peters, Jan (2021):
Perception and prediction of the putting distance of robot putting movements under different visual/viewing conditions. (Publisher's Version)
In: PLOS ONE, 16 (4), PLOS, ISSN 1932-6203,
DOI: 10.26083/tuprints-00019384,
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Item Type: Article
Origin: Secondary publication via sponsored Golden Open Access
Status: Publisher's Version
Title: Perception and prediction of the putting distance of robot putting movements under different visual/viewing conditions
Language: English
Abstract:

The purpose of this paper is to examine, whether and under which conditions humans are able to predict the putting distance of a robotic device. Based on the “flash-lag effect” (FLE) it was expected that the prediction errors increase with increasing putting velocity. Furthermore, we hypothesized that the predictions are more accurate and more confident if human observers operate under full vision (F-RCHB) compared to either temporal occlusion (IRCHB) or spatial occlusion (invisible ball, F-RHC, or club, F-B). In two experiments, 48 video sequences of putt movements performed by a BioRob robot arm were presented to thirty-nine students (age: 24.49±3.20 years). In the experiments, video sequences included six putting distances (1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0 m; experiment 1) under full versus incomplete vision (F-RCHB versus I-RCHB) and three putting distances (2. 0, 3.0, and 4.0 m; experiment 2) under the four visual conditions (F-RCHB, I-RCHB, F-RCH, and F-B). After the presentation of each video sequence, the participants estimated the putting distance on a scale from 0 to 6 m and provided their confidence of prediction on a 5-point scale. Both experiments show comparable results for the respective dependent variables (error and confidence measures). The participants consistently overestimated the putting distance under the full vision conditions; however, the experiments did not show a pattern that was consistent with the FLE. Under the temporal occlusion condition, a prediction was not possible; rather a random estimation pattern was found around the centre of the prediction scale (3 m). Spatial occlusion did not affect errors and confidence of prediction. The experiments indicate that temporal constraints seem to be more critical than spatial constraints. The FLE may not apply to distance prediction compared to location estimation.

Journal or Publication Title: PLOS ONE
Journal volume: 16
Number: 4
Publisher: PLOS
Collation: 31 Seiten
Classification DDC: ?? ddc_dnb_796 ??
Divisions: ?? fb3_sport ??
Date Deposited: 30 Aug 2021 12:10
Last Modified: 31 Aug 2021 09:00
DOI: 10.26083/tuprints-00019384
Corresponding Links:
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-193840
URI: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/id/eprint/19384
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